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Choice: The question of women’s rights voice

Wearing religious veil is either encouraged or discouraged. There’s no ground for the middle. But the real problem is not about the attire. It’s the choice. Choice to make free decisions no matter how noble or stupid they are.

In 2010, France passed the bill that bans face coverings such as masks, balaclavas, helmets, niqab, and burqa and it came in effective by 2011. It imposes a fine of 150 euros on an individual wearing a face cover and 15,000 euros on anyone who forces others to wear one. It didn’t come with no backfire, as expected. The public including supporters of human rights such as Amnesty International condemned the bill, saying it is the violation of freedom of expression of women who wear the face covers.

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Online discrimination: Can I get rid of my nationality?

I’ve been having some trouble buying things online because my nationality makes it difficult. It’s the constraint within free.

As much as I love the smell of books and its public representation of my character, most of the time in recent several years I’m bound to look for ebooks as I make living in countries where only small bookstores with selective collection of genres are available. However, I cannot always find the exact book or the right format online, which forces me to download it for free in pdf forms. But even that, it’s not commonly available because the books I look for often are not the bestseller-kind, but academic purposes.

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Development links

How to design a survey for estimating returns to education? Do returns to education depend on how and who you ask? Yes. Turns out short questionnaires do lead to biased estimates of returns to education. Even thought who responds ,self or proxy, did not make significant difference, the level of biased estimates differed between education level.

Experiments on TOMS shoes. It doesn’t affect local shoes market negatively but it doesn’t seem to have much impact on poor children either. Important thing is, TOMS wanted the results to be published.

The patterns: labelling, stereotyping, and ADHD

As human, we create ideas and give them names. It goes the same when we identify a person. My recent experience of ADHD test taught me how we label others.

A few weeks ago, I had an odd experience of my feeling. Having a right feeling from an odd experience might sound better fitting. I was visiting Korea for a holiday and first thing I did was go on Youtube and watch almost everything that I couldn’t in internet-deficient rural Malawi. Then I stumbled upon one video showing 2 children asking which one had an ADHD. It was a bit of eye-opener given that ADHD symptoms I know was just about lacking focus and having lots of distractions. The child with ADHD answered questions calmly and very grown-up-like, compared to the other non-ADHD child. After all, the disorder wasn’t just about lacking focus and being hyper-active. I instantly got interested and searched for more about it until I made it to ADHD in adult topic. Upon reading related articles, I had some feelings and got curious if I had ADHD in adult. So I tested myself using the unofficial ADHD test for adults. (Author’s note: The points really don’t matter. This is meant to be a fun and educational video on ADHD. Lots of this can be normal behavior. We’re adding a note to this video soon to help avoid confusion. ‘WARNING: Many of these ‘Symptoms’ are common human behaviors. With ADHD they occur often, and they impair you.)

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Politics of bathroom: that’s not what I meant, lady

I’m okay with not being understood. But I guess I’m not okay with being misunderstood. But do I have energy to correct? Not every time.

There’s always the moment where I think, ‘that’s not what I meant’ but it just costs too much energy to correct it. And we just let the conversation float to somewhere I never would have thought to be, because that’s an awful place.

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Beneath the number

Couple of boys belly downed on the side road near the entrance of the biggest shopping centre in the city. I tried to look at what they were doing in that position. They were sipping water from the ground with their face down so as not to get their hands dirty. That didn’t shock me though.

As I entered the shopping centre parking lot, however, I got shocked by the number of expensive heavy cars with different organisations’ names on them. Prices of cars are not the problem. But it’s the myriad of NGOs and institutions in the city where drinking black water from the ground still happens.

Lost language or too much language

What we say and what we mean does not share the same path anymore.

What we say and what we mean does not share the same path anymore. What we understand, let alone does not anchor the word we say. The article ‘Trump, the University of Chicago, and the collapse of public language’ written by Nathan Heller for New Yorker after a period of puzzling impressions over multiple events, led me to a judgment how unbearably light our – public – messages have become. The article explores down to the point how public language has lost its weight of authenticity and visualisation. One group with certain ideals and demands fights against the group on the other side who also has the same ideals and demands. It wasn’t a power game. Neither was it about fulfilling conflict resolution exercise hours required by any course regulations. Lack of communication? Maybe. Two parties stand against each other for the same ideals.

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the wisdom of insecurity

little thoughts on insecurity, traveler, and the weather

Say, it’s winter. It’s been very cold for the last few weeks but today the sun is shining on my head and the wind has stopped. Maybe it’s not going to last long since the winter is usually longer than a few weeks, a few months more maybe. Now people wake up. Take a shower. Then have breakfast. After spending enough time to figure out what the weather is like today, they stand in front of the closet and think what to wear for a few minutes.

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insecurity and integration

It seems to make sense that poor integration brings insecurity. Personally, on the contrary, I think insecurity brings poor integration, not vice versa.

The integration dynamic caused by push factors such as discrimination, I think have distinctive outcomes, compared to when it’s driven by natural needs. Mainly because the former one starts by dividing and labelling each “group” but the latter ones are rather categorised by the purposes.

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Thoughts on good-hearted

Long story short, I hate good-hearted people.

I don’t know if it’s universal. But I have a bone to pick with the so called good-hearted people. Being kind and modest became a norm and a virtue in our society, as if it is the default set of proper human being. However, the rosy and lousy expectation that kindness is the superior of all qualities is just wrong.

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